Monday, June 10, 2013

Some more fotos of Pontevedra as it was in 1900 and how it is today, at least down in the old quarter. Apologies for the reflections in the older fotos but, as I've explained, I have to take snaps of them in their frames in an exhibition.

So, let's start with the spot where I'm to be found on most days, Plaza de Verdura. Or Vegetables Square. Simply put, this is the place where they used to sell vegetables, as opposed to, say, firewood and bread. Firstly, 3 fotos taken 113 years ago:-


And here's one I took today of the building in the background of all of these, now known (in Gallego) as Casa da Luz. Not light but electricity, as this was the first building in the city to have the latter.


I didn't take this further back, to get a panoramic view to compare with the 3 above, as the square was full of not just tapas-eaters but also the Sunday flea-market and I felt these would spoil things. I'll post a full foto tomorrow. The building, by the way, now houses the Pontevedra City Turismo (where the foto exhibition is), as opposed to the 3 other tourist offices in the city, representing Galicia, Pontevedra Province and the Rías Baixas. Stupid but you employ more people this way. Or 'under-employ', more accurately. And you need more of your relatives to translate the brochures.

Here's the modern view of the street which runs up from the top right of the pix of Pl. Verdura.


And here's a reprise of yesterday's old foto, together with another new one, taken from a more similar perspective. And showing both of the smaller houses of the original.






If you look hard enough, you can see the Burger King logo in the windows. You can also see that the house on the right has had a floor added. With little thought to aesthetics.

Finally, here are then and now fotos taken of the San Roque church, with the bullring in the background, looking very similar now to how it did back then.













It's interesting to note that George Borrow walked past this church in 1838 on his way up from the Customs House in the port to the (walled) city which is now 'the old quarter'. As I recall, he moaned it was a long and muddy walk. So, no tarmac, I guess.

8 comments:

kraal said...

Colin, BBC FOUR 22.00 you may find of interest and it could explain a certain early retirement. K.

Colin said...

Thanks, K. Are you thinking of someone we knew?

kraal said...

No, it's about the Catholic church, abuse, and the Popes involvement. I bailed out in my twenties.

Sierra said...

Further to last Tuesday's note regarding St James' boat and the trip to Galicia, the following may be of interest - Cartagena claims he landed there:

http://www.murciatoday.com/restoration-of-cartagena-portside-images-nearly-complete_17151-a.html

Colin said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Colin said...

Thanks, Sierra. This would be when he first came to Spain, alive, to preach the Word. For his second trip - not alive - he chose a granite boat without sales or crew. It must have been a miracle he made it back to Spain. Not that there's any evidence he was ever here. But why spoil a good - moneyspinning - story?

Perry said...

Colin,

Thanks for the photos. I rather like the added fourth floor Mansard roof with the dormer windows. Usually the upper floors were the servant's garret, so perhaps an indication of increased wealth of the owner of the building? Do you know anything of the history?

Cordially,

Perry

Perry said...

Colin,

I'm sorry, but when I saw this; well it just has to the defining image of the eponymous, garret cloistered, author of this erudite Galician blog.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Carl_Spitzweg_-_Der_arme_Poet_%28Neue_Pinakothek%29.jpg

Mea culpa.

Perry