Saturday, July 07, 2018

Thoughts from Galcia, spain: 7.7.18

Spanish life is not always likeable but it is compellingly loveable. 
- Christopher Howse: A Pilgrim in Spain. 

If you've arrived here because of an interest in Galicia or Pontevedra, see my web page 
hereGarish but informative.

Spain
  • If you've an abiding interest in Spanish politics, click here for news of the PP leadership election.
  • Alarming news of a future doctor shortage here.
  • Surprising news of a novel way to age wine. At least on the north coast . . .
Life in Spain
  • One wonders how this compares, pro rata, with other nations
  • There's a new clause appearing in some urbanisations and communities in Spain under which buyers agree never to offer their apartments or homes to Airbnb and similar outfits. Inevitable.
The EU and the UK
  • 'B Day' and went. And here's the government spin: 
- Theresa May claimed last night to have united her warring cabinet behind a softer Brexit that would keep Britain in parts of the single market. The prime minister said that she had secured the backing of senior ministers after an all-day meeting. She urged her divided party to unite and “move at pace” towards a deal with Brussels. . . The agreed proposal would tie Britain to EU rules by creating a “common rule book” for industrial goods and agricultural products and would take Britain out of the single market for services. . . . A Downing Street source said that no ministers had resigned and that all the cabinet had agreed the government’s position. . . . . The prime minister said that she had won a “new business-friendly customs model with freedom to strike new trade deals around the world”. A detailed note later said that this was the “facilitated customs arrangement” . . . The deal promises to “end free movement” but says that a “mobility framework” will allow EU citizens to work in Britain and does not rule out giving them preferential treatment.
  • More objective comments:-
- If this sets the terms for the UK's proposal for a formal agreement with the EU, covering also the Irish border question, then it spells the end of any expectation that we might have had of a negotiated settlement.
- There are more than enough serious impediments for the EU to reject this proposal out of hand.
- The indications from Brussels, though, is that the EU will play the long game. It is said to have given up any hope of reaching an agreed Brexit settlement, and has already discounted this latest mad endeavour on the part of Mrs May.  But there are many arrangements to be sorted out, to minimise the potential damage caused by the UK crashing out of the EU, so the Commission and Member States will want to take their time, only pulling the plug at the last possible minute, if they are forced to do so
- We can, therefore, expect a fairly muted response to the UK White Paper, when it finally appears. If it follows the form of this proposal, M. Barnier will not say yes, but he will not say no, either. Instead, after low-level talks through the summer, it will be left to the October European Council to do the deed – which may even delay the final rejection to the New Year. 
- Either way, it is at this point that we must consider any meaningful negotiations to be over. Mrs May, in pandering to her cabinet, has ignored the only parties that matter in these talks – the EU institutions and the Member States. Whether wittingly or otherwise, she has given a rational Brexit the kiss of death. Chaos will necessarily ensue.
- In attempting to split off services from goods, and then cherry-picking the goods, the UK is challenging the integrity of the Market. If this was to proceed, the acquis would become precisely the à la carte menu that the EU has refused to entertain. 
- In attempting to split off services from goods, and then cherry-picking the goods, the UK is challenging the integrity of the Market. If this was to proceed, the acquis would become precisely the à la carte menu that the EU has refused to entertain. This is probably an insurmountable hurdle
- If this proposal is accepted by the EU, we are faced with becoming a vassal state of the EU. They have us exactly where they want us – unable to compete, taking enormous quantities of their products at inflated prices, protected from global competition by the fortress Europe tariff and regulatory wall and impeded from doing trade deals around the globe.
- We will be controlling neither laws, nor trade, nor borders. A total, humiliating capitulation.

Galicia/Pontevedra
  • Interesting news from our northern coast. Local papers talk of farmers' sheds being roofed with aluminium from a plane downed at this 'secret' site.
© David Colin Davies, Pontevedra: 6.7.18

2 comments:

Perry said...

Subsistence agriculturists dire byres ebing roofied from secret? site of aerospace panelling! Nombre de Dios! Donde está esto?

Perry said...

Subsistence agriculturists'