Monday, February 03, 2020

Thoughts from Pontevedra, Galicia, Spain: 3.2.20

Spanish life is not always likeable but it is compellingly loveable.   
Christopher Howse: A Pilgrim in Spain  
Spanish Politics
  • There was a full-page spread in in a local paper yesterday about the consequences of Brexit for Spain. Every one of them was negative. You might have thought this would influence Spain to take less than a very hard line on Gibraltar but there's no chance of this. The EU's head of diplomacy, foreign affairs and security happens to be Spanish and his comments lend support to the belief that - even if it's contrary to the interests of the thousands of Spanish citizens who work on The Rock - Spain will use Gibraltar as a pawn. Specifically, according The 'Observer': The EU will back Spain over its territorial claims by giving Madrid the power to exclude its 34,000 inhabitants from any potential trade deal. Maybe Brits should opt en masse for other holiday destinations. To increase the pain in Spain, as it were.
Spanish/Galician Life 
  • An example of the esquelas I mentioned yesterday. 'Tombstones' in (financial) English. There were 30 of them in yesterday's Voz de Galicia:-
  • The government is planning to do something about the growing evil of gambling, especially among kids. The trouble is the industry - it's reported - is fighting back with the best/most expensive lobbyists and lawyers that money can buy.
  • A cartoon in point. Actually about the UK but same difference:-
  • Galicia is forecast to lose c. 10% of its population over the next decade. Which will surely make at least 2 of our 3 'international' airports even more redundant than they are now. About which the 'localist' local politicians will do nothing, of course.
  • I tried to get a new pair of reading glasses at Pontevedra's Sunday flea-market yesterday. I eventually found the one I needed but not before the trader and I had been through every one of the the jumble of 20-30 cases in his tray. As on every previous occasion. I can understand why a chap standing around all morning doesn't conclude he should avoid wasting his time by putting them in strength-order, but what about the customer's time? Would I go so far as to say this attitude is by no means unique to him? Yes.
The UK
  • If you're at all tempted - during this brilliant video - to feel sorry for Katie Hopkins, hang on for her acceptance speech at this awards ceremony:
The Way of the World 
  • Healthfoods . . .
Spanish  
  • Word of the Day:- Indagar: Investigate. Which happens a lot here.
Finally . . .
  • This is an article on on a great new app/podcast. And this is the URL for said app, but I've yet to be able to get it as a podcast. Maybe later today. But you can at least listen to the original text, with a translation on screen as you go.
  • P. S. Just an app, it seems. No podcast.

7 comments:

Perry said...

A chap in Galicia needs to know this, percebes notwithstanding.

The campaign message that emerges is that some mussels do not open during cooking, but it has nothing to do with their quality; it is simply because they have strong adductor muscles that will not let the shell ease open in the steam.

https://archive.is/20121230111119/http://www.frdc.com.au/knowledge/image-story/Pages/default.aspx#selection-1535.0-1539.165

Perry said...

Colin,

In your A Scouser Lost in Galizalbion blog you mentioned the stretch between Olmedo and Zamora had been complete. That was 21st December 2015. StreetView offers a series of views of Zamora station charting progress from 2008 to 2018.
https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@41.5142462,-5.7438822,3a,15.1y,52h,83.24t/am=t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sgPGO-RFGifuDDvEOrlaVfA!2e0!5s20081001T000000!7i13312!8i6656

You mentioned you travel to Madrid each month. Do you drive or take the Alvia?

Colin Davies said...

Alvia. On it now.

Colin Davies said...

Night train.

Perry said...

That's very interesting. I was trying to figure out where the AVE would be routed & read on Wikipedia that it will run to Santiago DC via Orense. The Alvia is Iberian gauge & 250 kph. The AVE is standard gauge & 350 kph. I was curious about prices & looked on Trainline. If I travelled by the 8:18-15:06 Pontevedra/Madrid Chamartín on 6th March, it's £25-62 or £26-65 first class! How do fares as low as that reimburse the lenders?

I'm booked to travel from Bourne End, Bucks to Yeovil Junction on 12th February, £35-00 open return with Senior Railcard. 3 changes, Maidenhead, Reading & Basingstoke & 3.5 hours.

Adif will re-gauge the tracks for AVE & they'll have to upgrade the train control.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_Axis_high-speed_rail_line

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madrid%E2%80%93Galicia_high-speed_rail_line

Bon voyage.

Perry.

Perry said...

https://www.europapress.es/economia/noticia-economia-ave-adif-ratifica-llegada-ave-galicia-2019-20181129171826.html

Colin Davies said...

@ Perry.
Train ticket last night 52 euros for a bed. Returning Friday night 62 euros. After Godl card discount.

Reclining seat about 36 euros last night, I think.

There are special deals at the moment - ahead of competition - but I don't understand that minimal difference between Tourist and First Class that you cite.

6 March, I get €28.65 and €29.80 As I say, beats me.